Remarks at Social, Humanitarian & Cultural Committee. Crime prevention and criminal justice

Ambassador Martha Pobee
Permanent Representative
Ghana Permanent Mission to the United Nations
New York City
October 3, 2019

AS DELIVERED

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for giving me the floor.  My delegation also thanks the Secretary-General for his comprehensive reports submitted under this agenda item and takes note of the recommendations contained therein.  Ghana aligns itself with the statement delivered by the African group.

Mr. Chairman,

Crime prevention and criminal justice is critical to the realisation of goal 16 of the SDGs, as demonstrated in the work of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice.

Combating crime has remained a challenge in contemporary times, particularly due to the use of ICT to perpetrate crime and criminal activity.  Ghana is deeply concerned by the growing negative trend, which seriously undermines the positive contribution as well as potential of ICT for sustainable development.

Ghana is also concerned that cyber crimes and negative trends on online platforms continue to pose serious challenges to law enforcement and the ability of security agencies to effectively tackle them.  Social vices like the exploitation of children and the youth, drug abuse, terrorism, and corruption perpetrated on online platforms require concerted action.

There is no doubt that tackling cybercrime requires cooperation and information-sharing among States, due to the transnational nature of this menace.  Ghana endorses the call for the establishment of mutual legal assistance treaty among states in order to remove barriers to information-sharing for speedy investigations and the subsequent trial of cyber-related crimes.

We also recognise that limited capacity of States and the absence of comprehensive domestic legal frameworks pose a challenge to addressing cybercrime. We must, therefore, focus on strengthening legal frameworks and building capacity to effectively fight cybercrime at every level. Ghana has ratified the Malabo Convention (Africa Union Convention on Cyber Security & Personal Data Protection) and the Budapest Convention (Convention on Cybercrime), which underscore the need for international cooperation to tackle cybercrime and improve on cyber security from best practices globally.

Mr. Chairman,

In Ghana approximately 10.32 million Ghanaians are active on the internet and the number keeps growing by two per cent every year. This has necessitated measures by government to help combat cybercrime through the development of two main pieces of legislation namely the Electronic Communications Act 2008 (Act 775) and the Electronic Transactions Act 2008(Act 772) to regulate the cyberspace in Ghana.

Ghana has also introduced the Cyber Security Bill which is expected to be passed into law by the end of 2019. The bill, when passed into law, would facilitate the establishment of a cyber security authority as well as a cyber security fund.  It will also address child online safety issues, sextortion and blackmailing involving obscene content, some of which are related to children. Additionally, public awareness campaigns have been launched to sensitise the general public to these dangers.

Our efforts in combating cyber-crime will be significantly enhanced with by the application of tools such as anti-cybercrime forensic laboratory for investigations by the security agencies and Ghana welcomes support from donor partners to complement government’s efforts.

Mr. Chairman,

Ghana looks forward to the upcoming Fourteenth Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice in Kyoto, Japan, from 20 to 27 April 2020 and is very much hopeful that the Congress would have outcomes that would be proactive in scope, prevent crime and ensure criminal justice, including through the use of modern technologies like artificial intelligence.

We wish to use this opportunity to commend UNODC for its proactive role in assisting States in their response to cyber crime and the interrelated issues of transnational organized crime.  Ghana remains committed to the work of the UNODC and supports calls for an increase in allocation of funds to help in carrying out its important activities.

In conclusion, Mr. Chairman, we wish to stress the need for international co-operation to assist Member States in adhering to international standards and to enhancing the positive use of ICT in administering criminal justice globally.  I thank you for your attention.

y and preventively as we consider the

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for giving me the floor.  My delegation also thanks the Secretary-General for his comprehensive reports submitted under this agenda item and takes note of the recommendations contained therein.  Ghana aligns itself with the statement delivered by the African group.

Mr. Chairman,

Crime prevention and criminal justice is critical to the realisation of goal 16 of the SDGs, as demonstrated in the work of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice.

Combating crime has remained a challenge in contemporary times, particularly due to the use of ICT to perpetrate crime and criminal activity.  Ghana is deeply concerned by the growing negative trend, which seriously undermines the positive contribution as well as potential of ICT for sustainable development.

Ghana is also concerned that cyber crimes and negative trends on online platforms continue to pose serious challenges to law enforcement and the ability of security agencies to effectively tackle them.  Social vices like the exploitation of children and the youth, drug abuse, terrorism, and corruption perpetrated on online platforms require concerted action.

There is no doubt that tackling cybercrime requires cooperation and information-sharing among States, due to the transnational nature of this menace.  Ghana endorses the call for the establishment of mutual legal assistance treaty among states in order to remove barriers to information-sharing for speedy investigations and the subsequent trial of cyber-related crimes.

We also recognise that limited capacity of States and the absence of comprehensive domestic legal frameworks pose a challenge to addressing cybercrime. We must, therefore, focus on strengthening legal frameworks and building capacity to effectively fight cybercrime at every level. Ghana has ratified the Malabo Convention (Africa Union Convention on Cyber Security & Personal Data Protection) and the Budapest Convention (Convention on Cybercrime), which underscore the need for international cooperation to tackle cybercrime and improve on cyber security from best practices globally.

Mr. Chairman,

In Ghana approximately 10.32 million Ghanaians are active on the internet and the number keeps growing by two per cent every year. This has necessitated measures by government to help combat cybercrime through the development of two main pieces of legislation namely the Electronic Communications Act 2008 (Act 775) and the Electronic Transactions Act 2008(Act 772) to regulate the cyberspace in Ghana.

Ghana has also introduced the Cyber Security Bill which is expected to be passed into law by the end of 2019. The bill, when passed into law, would facilitate the establishment of a cyber security authority as well as a cyber security fund.  It will also address child online safety issues, sextortion and blackmailing involving obscene content, some of which are related to children. Additionally, public awareness campaigns have been launched to sensitise the general public to these dangers.

Our efforts in combating cyber-crime will be significantly enhanced with by the application of tools such as anti-cybercrime forensic laboratory for investigations by the security agencies and Ghana welcomes support from donor partners to complement government’s efforts.

Mr. Chairman,

Ghana looks forward to the upcoming Fourteenth Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice in Kyoto, Japan, from 20 to 27 April 2020 and is very much hopeful that the Congress would have outcomes that would be proactive in scope, prevent crime and ensure criminal justice, including through the use of modern technologies like artificial intelligence.

We wish to use this opportunity to commend UNODC for its proactive role in assisting States in their response to cyber crime and the interrelated issues of transnational organized crime.  Ghana remains committed to the work of the UNODC and supports calls for an increase in allocation of funds to help in carrying out its important activities.

In conclusion, Mr. Chairman, we wish to stress the need for international co-operation to assist Member States in adhering to international standards and to enhancing the positive use of ICT in administering criminal justice globally.  I thank you for your attention.

specific challenges facing the Great Lakes Region.

Thank you Mr. President.

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